Sonntag, 11. Januar 2015

They called him Brunty

The term of endearment implied him having a heart, a conscience and a sense of justice.

Today, on the streets of Paris, pretending to be there as a marcher for the cause instead of fulfilling his duty, he apparently got swept away by the atmosphere of for once belonging to a grand nation and dared to falsely quote Voltaire:
Now the full quote by Voltaire's biographer would have been: ""I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it."

I guess he did not particularly want to mention death in any shape or form.

What is it that renders a quite successful journalist so utterly incapable of self-reflection? Why does he happily jump on the bandwagon to proclaim his defense for freedom of speech in the media while at the same time he has been part of the most outrageous campaign to shut down discussion on another subject on twitter?

While his rather shoddy reporting e.g. on the "full DNA match" in the McCann case has been one of the cornerstones of the scepticism that evolved over the years towards the tale of abduction, he nevertheless allowed himself to be used in the campaign to "hunt the trolls", to shut down dissent on social media by singling out and making an example of a 63 year old mother which ultimately led to her death.

Brenda Leyland was voicing an opinion, no matter if one liked the content or the language in which she did so. It was her right to do so since what she wrote was neither racist nor threatening. She simply refused to believe in the concept of "abduction" much the same as some we are mourning today might not have believed in the concept of "God". After all there is no evidence for either.

But while BRUNTY is shedding crocodile tears in Paris and resorting to the philosophers, the family of Brenda Leyland are still waiting for an apology for his doorstepping and hounding of their mother that led to her death.

So I can only draw the conclusion that he is not ultimately sincere in his demand for free speech but secretly adds: ...for proper media only... That media that is usually the origin of enciting hatred and dividing nations, or the wilful executors.

Nobody seems to call him Brunty these days...

Kommentare:

  1. You have no idea what actually caused her death. Wait for the inquest - you might get a surprise.

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    1. Well I never implied I did know the cause of her death, that is why I wrote death and not suicide.

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  2. Ch. 7 : Helvétius : The Contradiction, p. 188

    'What a fuss about an omelette!' he had exclaimed when he heard of the burning. How abominably unjust to persecute a man for such an airy trifle as that! "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it," was his attitude now.
    Ch. 7 : Helvetius : The Contradiction, p. 199; because of quote marks around the original publication of these words, they are often attributed to Voltaire, though Hall was not actually quoting him but summarizing his attitude with the expression. The statement was widely popularized when misattributed to Voltaire as a "Quotable Quote" in Reader's Digest (June 1934), but in response to the misattribution, Hall had been quoted in Saturday Review (11 May 1935), p. 13, as stating: I did not mean to imply that Voltaire used these words verbatim and should be surprised if they are found in any of his works. They are rather a paraphrase of Voltaire's words in the Essay on Tolerance — "Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so too."
    The paragraph in which the statement first appears reads:

    "On the Mind" [De l'Esprit by Helvétius] became not the success of the season, but one of the most famous books of the century. The men who had hated it and had not particularly loved Helvétius, flocked round him now. Voltaire forgave him all injuries, intentional or unintentional. 'What a fuss about an omelette!' he had exclaimed when he heard of the burning. How abominably unjust to persecute a man for such an airy trifle as that! 'I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it,' was his attitude now.

    Another possible source for the quote was proposed by Norbert Guterman, editor of "A Book of French Quotations," who noted a letter to M. le Riche (February 6, 1770) in which Voltaire is quoted as saying: "Monsieur l'abbé, I detest what you write, but I would give my life to make it possible for you to continue to write" ("Monsieur l'abbé, je déteste ce que vous écrivez, mais je donnerai ma vie pour que vous puissiez continuer à écrire"). This remark, however, does not appear in the letter.

    http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Evelyn_Beatrice_Hall

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  3. Voltaire, in fact, never wrote this quote. Evelyn Beatrice Hall did, who, in The Friends of Voltaire (1906) signed S. G. Tallentyre, used it to sum up Voltaire's spirit : I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.
    http://www.projet-voltaire.fr/blog/actualite/voltaire-na-jamais-dit-je-ne-suis-pas-daccord-avec-vous-mais-je-me-battrai

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  4. Do perhaps remember that, hadn't Brunty ;-) corrected the most stupid F... the MCs, that myth would still sneak around the corner. It wasn't heroic, it was just fair.
    I think that he had no idea of BL's state of mind at being identified.
    Let's hope that the "one seven" will give us the strength to eradicate the concept of blasphemy. But it's not as easy as that and neither we nor our governments are Charlie. Who of us would take the risks they took ? Freedom of speech implies that all beliefs, religious or not, can be submitted to criticism and laugh. It implies also a right to reply.

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  5. I just had to delete the last incoming comment because of racism. I am not going to publish any rants agains races, ethnies or religions. Go back where you came from...

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